Airbender’s latest behind-the-scenes facts

Every time I don’t think I could love this show more than I already do, I’ve been proven wrong.

1.

In an interview with Animation World Network, series co-creator Brian Konitzko said he drew designs for Katara and Soka “just an hour before the presentation meeting.” “Of course, their designs have evolved since then, but you can recognize them from those first sketches,” he added.

Apparently, only two weeks passed between Konitzko and co-author, Michael Dante Dimartino, who came up with the idea for the series and presented it to Nickelodeon.

2.

In the same interview, Konitzko listed some of his and DeMartino’s inspirations. He noted that Hayao Miyazaki’s work “really inspired and continues to inspire us,” and said that A princess Mononoke In particular, she “encouraged” him.

Miramax / Courtesy Everett Collection

Cowboy Bebop Another inspiration was, as “a perfect example of an epic series whose range of tunes has expanded”, as well as FLCLwhich Konitzko said “rewrote the rules for everything.”

Samuel Goldwyn Films / Courtesy Everett Collection

3.

Mako, who voiced Uncle Ero in the first two seasons, was offered the role by Konitzko and Dimartino without an audition. After his death in 2006, Mako was replaced by Greg Baldwin.

In an interview with IGN, Di Martino said, “We’ve both seen Brian Mako and I in two movies and got him the role without even hearing an audition. The first time he scored, we knew he was perfect. He was really funny and it brought him so much warmth towards the character. But he can also seem very wise and serious when he needs to. We are honored that he was a part of symbol picture. “

Skouras Images / Courtesy: Everett Collection.

Pictured is Mako in the 1988 movie, Washing machine.

4.

Greg Baldwin was in a unique position to take on this role, all because of a gift he received decades ago. In 1977, he was awarded the soundtrack for Pacific Overtures, a musical for which Mako was nominated for a Tony Award for his performance as a reader. “I was one of the few people who made an impression on Mako for 30 years,” Baldwin told The Guardian.

Regardless of a very lucky birthday gift, meeting the high standards set by his predecessor was a frightening task. Baldwin said, “I knew from the start that I wasn’t Mako. Mako was nominated for an Oscar, Tony, and the first Asian American theater opened in the United States.”

Baldwin referred to the role he and Mako played as “a father figure for an entire generation.”

5.

Tennis legend Serena Williams is a huge fan of both Avatar: Another Airbender and its sequel series, The legend of KorraAnd I got the chance to appear in both.

Bradley Canaris / Getty Images

at symbol pictureIn Season 3, she appears as Ming, a Fire Nation prison guard who befriends Uncle Iru while he is imprisoned. qorraa female voiced sage.

6.

There are several key differences between the unmanned pilot, which was produced as part of the merchandising process, and which eventually aired on Nickelodeon. For example, Aang was voiced by Mitchell Musso Hanna Montana Fame, instead of Zack Tyler Eisen…

…Katara was named “Kia”, which would eventually be her mother’s name…

…and tragically, there is no uncle Iroh in sight.

7.

The different bending styles have their roots in the true styles of martial arts. This is suggested by Sifu Kisu, the show’s martial arts advisor and kung fu advisor.

De Martino told IGN, “Ba Gua’s circular movements became bending of air; Tai Chi’s fluid movements bending of water; Hung Gar’s powerful style was perfect for bending the ground; and the fast, aggressive style of Northern Shaolin was the inspiration for fire-breaking.”

8.

Seifu Kisu himself favors Northern Shaolin, the inspiration behind Operation Breaking Fire. He told Men’s Health, “It’s a very powerful and dynamic style. It uses strong hand and leg movements.”

9.

According to the Guardian, Tov, the blind 12-year-old who works hard to harden the soil and who sees by using her feet to sense movement and vibrations on the ground, was originally supposed to be a “macho man”.

Toff’s voice actress, Michaela Gill Murphy, was only 11 years old when she was cast. Murphy told the Guardian: “Fans have reached out, saying, ‘I’ve never had a blind personality, I can relate to, constantly crack jokes, and be at peace with who they are. Too many times you see people with disabilities being pampered.’ Tove does the opposite.” It teaches us that what we see as weakness is what you allow, unless you allow others to define it for you.”

10.

Sifu Kisu told Men’s Health that Toph’s unique approach to earth bending has made himself a unique inspiration: The bend is based on Chow Gar, rather than Hung Gar. Chow Gar expert Sifu Manuel Rodriguez was Toph’s character model for her curvature.

11.

Lead writer Aaron Ehhas told Vice that The Fire Nation’s look was originally more intense (and exclusive) drawn from Japanese culture and history. But that changed when the show’s team realized that associating one country with one that had been labeled evil would be a huge mistake.

Ehasz explained, “You want to inspire without taking over. You don’t want to inadvertently say something about a culture. For example, early on a lot of Fire Nation designs were inspired by designs from Japan, which was a problem – you have a nation Bad, and if all of their designs are Japanese, you’re projecting a bad message about their culture. We’ve completely reworked the art so it’s more broadly inspired.”

12.

The beloved (but always doomed) cabbage merchant wasn’t supposed to be a recurring character. His voice actor, James C., told Slate, “I didn’t invest much in his background because I didn’t think he’d be back. I just learned that he had a deep, steady, and somewhat strange attachment to his product. It was his guiding principle, that he loves his cabbage. His life has been a cabbage.

On why the seemingly random character has such enduring appeal, Sie said, “It sums up all our frustrations and indignation. We’re all a cabbage dealer.”

13.

And now, for some behind-the-scenes anecdotes from the publicity stunt that appeared in Avatar add-ons. One of the most terrifying monsters of symbol picture The universe is Koh the Face Stealer, a bicentennial spirit that does exactly what you expect of it.

There were two other names considered for the character: Koh, Expression Taker, Koh, and Mug Mugger.

14.

An important aspect of Iroh’s backstory is his unsuccessful attempt to conquer Ba Sing Se City. The creative team discussed making this time period special, but it never materialized.

15th.

Bloodletting is a variety of water bending processes in which powerful bending tools can control the movement of the human body by controlling the water in it. The writers jokingly referred to this horrific form of bowing as a “stop hitting yourself” style.

16.

One of Toph’s competitors (and later allies) is called Boulder. The show’s creative team had hoped to get Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson to voice the character, but that didn’t happen. Instead, Mick Foley, another retired professional wrestler, became the voice of Boulder.

17.

The message on the picture of Eroh’s son he sings in “Tales of Ba Singh Si” translates to “General Eroh, I will see you again when victory is achieved. Your faithful son, Lu Ten.”

18.

On an episode of the podcast Avatar: defy the elementsDiMartino called the episode “The Great Divide,” an episode of the first season believed to be among the series’ weakest, “a great filler.” Konitzko called it “terrible,” and added that he didn’t think changing its ending “would have saved her.”

In the episode, Aang tries to ease tensions between two tribes that have long been in conflict with each other. He does this by telling a white lie about the origin of the conflict, and as an added bonus, he saves everyone from being devoured by the valley’s giant monsters.

19.

And finally: During the same podcast appearance, the creators revealed that Zuko would be an adult character, until Nickelodeon Executive Producer Eric Coleman suggested that teenage Zuko would be “terrifying.” It was a note from Coleman that inspired the character to begin with, in fact, because he believed Fire Lord Ozai needed “some boots on the floor.”

But once Zuko was invented, they knew he would redeem himself and teach Aang how to use fire. Konitzko said that this plot point was in the Bible series, a document used in creative development that gathers information about the show’s world, characters, and plot.

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