Ray-Tracing from Dying Light 2 is a game changer on PC



What horrors lurk in the shadows? What are the nightmarish neighborhood monsters that roam the streets at night? What does humanity want to lose in order to survive? Dying Light 2 Stay Human It is an open world action RPG set in the aftermath of a zombie outbreak, where fast-paced parkour action is as essential as a trusty bat or blade in hand. A vast, brutal and challenging experience where darkness and light play a major role in exploring the post-apocalyptic world and the engaging story it tells.

No matter what platform you play on, the development team at Techland They did their best to convey the tension of running through a dark corridor, being chased by swift creatures – or beings – of the night, trying to reach the light of dawn. The game’s first mantra was “Good Night, Good Luck”, and in the sequel to this mantra is truer than ever.

Modern technology and advances in hardware have helped elevate this type of immersion through a powerful blend of lighting, visual effects, art direction, animation, and detailed environments. Not only to sell any particular scene and desperate setting of the game, but also to offer gameplay opportunities that are only possible within this complex setting.

And on PC, the immersion of Dying Light 2 goes a few steps ahead thanks to a combination of ray tracing effects and NVIDIA DLSS call up. The difference was amazing, with Dying Light 2 being one of the most impressive examples of what ray tracing can offer in a vast open world. Ray-tracing shadows, global illumination, reflections, ambient occlusion, and more add depth to every inch of the city of Philidor, its residents, and its suburbs.


The difference was amazing, with Dying Light 2 being one of the most impressive examples of what ray tracing can offer in a vast open world.


Regardless of whether it’s a building basking in the midday sun or a seemingly dark and empty room full of potential horror in the event of an uneasy night, ray tracing adds a uniform cinematic quality that keeps the tension of the game running smoothly. With a full day-night cycle and the freedom to explore a plethora of buildings and points of interest, ray tracing is a real game-changer.

Which you can see in the next video.

As seen with the PC versions of Cyberpunk 2077 and TreatmentIt’s the awesome control, it’s the combination of multiple ray tracing effects that come together that create such an amazing transformation. Reflections allow metal surfaces to properly reflect incoming light, not to mention add appropriate reflections for reflective surfaces. Ray-tracing shades allow light from the sun to precisely create a dense Dying Light 2 blend of bright and dark. It allows the shadows to go softer when they need to be, and more intense as well.

Related: Our full review of Dying Light 2 Stay Human


Ray-tracing shadows also add depth to the grass and foliage, which double as play items when hiding from the world’s many dreads. Ray-traced ambient occlusion ensures that when objects meet the world, they don’t fully light up in the way that would give the general feeling of being floating as you’re simply looking at a ‘video game’. The same can be said for things that are visible and bright when they are not, such as the underside of a table or the side of a building facing the sun. Ray tracing makes things look as they do in the real world.

But even that is only part of the story.

One way to describe the effect, in relation to Dying Light 2’s ray tracing, is balance. The simple idea is that the interaction of light and shade gradually changes over the course of the day and your location. Sitting inside a single-hole railcar with no working lights, you can see how fast the light seeps into the shadows and darkness. Using traditional lighting methods that rely on counterfeiting, the entire same train carriage is lit in an unrealistic manner. When it comes to exploring a dangerous world like the one depicted here, entering a poorly lit room or structure the way it should be — well, the difference is transformative.


Ray-tracing shadows also add depth to the grass and foliage, which double as play items when hiding from the world’s many dreads. Ray-traced ambient occlusion ensures that when objects meet the world, they don’t fully light up in the way that would give the general feeling of being floating as you’re simply looking at a ‘video game’.


Accurate ray tracing bounces and traces light around the scene resulting in display of things like shadows, the luminance and color of objects, how a metal object can reflect light from a lamp, etc. In no way is it said that “Faking it” reduces the quality of lighting in the game while disabling ray tracing. From shadows to reflections to account for all the light of a cinematic sequence, realism can shine through.

The train car example is just one of the countless moments found during Dying Light 2. Each offers a completely different view of how realistic a scene or moment can look and feel, which in turn changes the way you perceive the world. Ray tracing increases immersion; Tension and terror. The splendor and mystery of the game, due to the light – according to the introduction – is a major player in the whole experience. It is, after all, in the name of the game.

If a single ray tracing effect needs to be highlighted above all others, it should be a universal ray tracing illumination. which refers to how objects absorb a light source such as the sun; Sets color and brightness. The profound effect this has on Dying Light 2’s environments is astounding. Suddenly the site looks how you’d expect it to be, and that moment when you transition from the outdoors to the indoors becomes seamless, natural, and cinematic. The sunset gives objects and windowed interiors a proper orange, the bright midday sun giving something like a concrete jungle a kind of glowing white aura.

There is of course a cost to all of this, and this comes with the tax and complex nature of calculating and presenting ray tracing effects in real time. Largely, this is why the term “hardware-based ray tracing” has become a mainstay in modern graphics. With NVIDIA’s groundbreaking efforts to make real-time ray tracing a reality with the GeForce RTX 20 series in 2018, the current Ampere-based GeForce RTX 30 series pushes things even further. So much so that RTX-based technology is required to make Dying Light 2, with all ray tracing effects enabled, a reality.


With ray tracing and DLSS, Dying Light 2 is in every part a true next-generation show where the in-game visuals are trending.


From the GeForce RTX 3050 all the way up to the GeForce RTX 3080, RT Cores handle all the math required to enable ray tracing. It’s the addition of Tensor Cores and the AI-based DLSS rendering that makes Dying Light 2’s ray tracing a reality even on the most advanced PCs. DLSS is something that probably needs no introduction, so we’ll give you a quick lift: it’s a form of powerful upgrade that uses AI to rebuild the image with motion. This is done to make it look equal and sometimes better than the original equivalent.

A very real form of digital magic, DLSS provides a bump in performance similar to a generation. With ray tracing and DLSS, Dying Light 2 is in every part a true next-generation show where the in-game visuals are trending. And for a game where going out at night is an exercise in pure terror, there’s something about being comfortable with realistic lighting that gives you the energy you need to take on the hordes of zombies, even if they’re hiding in hyper-realistic shadows.

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